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First Impressions

Four inspiring ideas for making a statement with your invitation suite.
By: 
LARA BURNAP
Issue: 

After 28 years as an event designer, Barbara Feld of Let’s Party! knows a thing or two about planning a wedding. 11 years ago, she decided to focus solely on her favorite detail of the big day: the invitation. “It sets the initial feeling,” says Feld. “The invite is a gift that you give the guests asking them to join the celebration—and you only have one chance at a first impression.” Feld shares her tips for creating an impact with your wedding invitation.

PRESENTATION IS EVERYTHING (above). There are so many options for how you send the invitation: tucked in a silk or velvet box or a creative envelope design, or adding a monogram or pattern that reflects the invite’s design. For an acrylic invitation featuring pressed flowers, Feld included pressed flowers in each corner of the accompanying silver high-gloss envelope.

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MORE THAN A FEELING. Textures help the guest connect with the invite whether it’s through wood, lace, silk, velvet, letterpress—it creates an inviting atmosphere. “Even more important than the material is how you use the material,” says Feld. Acrylic invitations can lend a cool and contemporary vibe, but depending on the imprint and images it can also become warm and lush. In this case, elegant black and white make a modern statement.

SHARE YOUR STORY. Feld’s favorite way to make guests feel a part of each step of the wedding is through the wedding program. “So many couples only think about the program as a way to share who’s walking down the aisle,” says Feld. “But it’s also a beautiful way to help the guests connect with the ceremony and the couple by sharing details like the invitation font was created using grandma’s handwriting or where the twig came from that adorned the invite.”

DETAILS MATTER. Get on Pinterest, Instagram and see what you like—but also think about who you are as a couple. “Trends come and go but your invitation needs to be timeless,” says Feld. “Tell a story about the celebration and the people.” For a couple’s vineyard wedding, the bride spoke of how they chose the location because her fiancé had proposed to her under a tree at the winery. Feld created soft green invites on two-ply paper, cinched with a band that also held a twig gathered from the same tree as a nod to both the engagement and upcoming ceremony.